[All numbers are in trillion btus, and come from the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Energy Consumption by Sector (Tables 2.1a through 2.1f) data through 2019.]

2019 U.S. Energy Consumption
There are three sectors of energy consumption: electricity (37%), transportation (28%), and heating (35%).



2019 U.S. Energy Consumption
The same 2019 data, but totaled on the top line, and with heating broken out by sector of use. Heating of industrial processes (like paper mills, cement kilns, chemical plants and steel mills) makes up 66% of all heating sector use, and 23% of total U.S. energy use. Fossil fuels make up 80% of total U.S. energy use.



Total U.S. Energy Use by Fuel (1950-2019)
Energy use has tripled, but has flattened out.



Total U.S. Energy Use by Fuel (1950-2019)
[Same data, but in line chart, not stacked.]



"Renewable" Portion of Total U.S. Energy Use
The "renewable" portion of the overall energy mix over time. 43% is still from polluting combustion sources (biomass/waste incineration and biofuels). The good news is that solar is growing most rapidly.



"Renewable" Portion of Total U.S. Energy Use
[Same data but in line chart, not stacked.]

Biomass/waste incineration and biofuels (ethanol/biodiesel) are combined in this chart to show that "bioenergy" is the largest "renewable" source and has grown rapidly, but leveled off since 2013. This chart also makes it clear that wind overtook hydroelectric in 2019.



U.S. Electricity Use by Fuel (1950-2019)
The next four charts are just the electricity sector (not transportation or heating). The largest sources in 2019 are natural gas (32%), coal (28%), and nuclear (23%). Wind come in at a distant 7%, but is rapidly increasing.



U.S. Electricity Use by Fuel (1950-2019)
[Same data, but in line chart, not stacked.]

Natural gas surpassed nuclear power in 2012 and overtook coal in 2019.



"Renewable" Portion of U.S. Electricity Use

The renewable electricity sector is now mostly hydroelectric and wind.



"Renewable" Portion of U.S. Electricity Use
[Same data, but in line chart, not stacked.]

Wind overtook hydro in 2019, and solar overtook biomass and waste incineration in 2018. Biomass and waste incineration is flatlining, as the grassroots anti-biomass movement, coordinated by Energy Justice Network, has defeated about 50 proposed biomass and waste incinerators between 2010 and 2014, and our work against trash incineration has that industry on the decline.



Industrial heating sources



Residential heating sources

Residential solar heating is growing quickly and may overtake residential wood burning (and its serious pollution hazards) in the next several years.



Commercial heating sources



Transportation energy use
91.5% is oil. 5% is biofuels (ethanol and biodiesel) and 3.4% is now natural gas.



Bioenergy use by sector
The biomass electricity sector would have increased dramatically since 2005 if not for the grassroots work we supported that stopped massive expansion of that industry.



2019 Bioenergy use, by sector



Natural gas use, by sector

Energy Justice Network was founded in the late 1990s to help communities fight off gas-fired power plants during the first of two major waves of gas-fired power plant development since that time. We've been warning that electricity (gas-fired power plants) would become the largest sector of demand for (fracked) gas, but have been unable to get the coal-focused mainstream environmental groups or foundation funders to support grassroots work to stop this. Nonetheless, hundreds of proposed gas-fired power plants were blocked by grassroots groups, largely without such support.



Coal use, by sector



Coal use, by sector (residential and commercial heating close-up)



Trends: fossil fuel use declining; gas, wind and solar replacing coal
Some analysis from our review of the Planet of the Humans documentary...

From 2000 through 2019, U.S. population grew 17% as electricity consumption fell 2.6%, reflecting energy conservation and efficiency, which should always be higher priorities than any type of generation. Total energy consumption (electricity, transportation and heating) increased 1.6% in that time (because energy use in transportation and the commercial and industrial heating sectors increased), but 99.9% of wind and 62% of solar is serving the electricity sector, where energy demand is falling. So, more wind and solar does not mean more energy use.

The growth of wind and solar since 2000 came while coal, and fossil fuel use in general, fell.

In the U.S., coal use has declined dramatically, replaced more by fracked gas than renewables. The 26% drop in coal use for electricity was matched by gas, wind, and solar increasing by 27%. By total energy consumption, the 11.6% drop in coal use was matched by gas, wind, and solar increasing 11.6%.

Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption by Fuel
 
Nuclear
Oil
Coal
Gas
Wind
Solar
Biomass & Waste
Incineration
Hydro
Geothermal
Fossil Fuels
(coal/oil/gas)
2000 21% 3% 53% 14% 0% 0% 1% 7% 0% 70%
2019 23% 1% 28% 32% 7% 2% 1% 7% 0% 60%
Difference +2.2% -2.5% -25.7% +17.6% +7.2% +1.7% +0.02% -0.6% +0.0% -10.6%
 
Share of U.S. Energy Consumption by Fuel (Electricity, transportation and heating sectors combined)
 
Nuclear
Oil
Coal
Gas
Wind
Solar
Biofuels, Biomass
& Waste Incineration
Hydro
Geothermal
Fossil Fuels
(coal/oil/gas)
2000 8% 39% 23% 24% 0% 0% 3% 3% 0% 86%
2019 8% 37% 11% 32% 3% 1% 5% 2% 0% 80%
Difference +0.5% -2.0% -11.6% +7.9% +2.7% +1.0% +1.93% -0.4% +0.0% -5.7%